Art Projects International

MARIANO FERRANTE

Mariano Ferrante
Mariano Ferrante, Monocromo N38/21 (detail), 2021, acrylic on canvas, 35 x 35 inches (88.9 x 88.9 cm)


Mariano Ferrante
(b. 1974, Bahía Blanca, Argentina) lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina. His richly colored works, often dense with lines and non-repeating patterns, come out of a conversation with the constructivist, concrete, and neo-concrete art movements as they were manifested in Latin America. He is also well known for engaging audiences and communities beyond museums and galleries, and has created numerous public commissions and site-specific installations in Argentina and the United States.

Ferrante has had solo exhibitions and commissions in leading cultural institutions in Buenos Aires including Fundación PROA, Centro Cultural de España, and Centro Cultural Recoleta. His work has also been shown at the National Museum of Fine Arts (MNBA), Buenos Aires; Museum of Modern Art of Buenos Aires (MAMBA); and Museum of Contemporary Art of Buenos Aires (MACBA). He is also well known for engaging audiences and communities beyond museums and galleries, and has created numerous public commissions and site-specific works in transit hubs and landmark buildings. Recent site-specific commissions include: Monocromía en cuatro colores Nro 2 at Centro Cultural Córdoba, Argentina (2021); Polyphony of Four Colors at Sala de Camara at Usina del Arte, Buenos Aires (2020); Transformations N1/2019 at Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church Day School, New York (2019); and Cosmorama 2009/2015 at Belgrano Subway Station, E line, Buenos Aires (2015).

Mariano Ferrante’s work is represented in major collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art of Buenos Aires (MACBA); Francis J. Greenburger Collection, New York; Montefiore Fine Art Collection, New York; and Union Industrial Argentina, Buenos Aires.

“Ferrante’s Monocromos give viewers agency over their optical experience by provoking bodily movement. These paintings contain four separate colors organized within vertical, horizontal, and diagonal stripes; however, from a distance of two meters, the canvases appear to be painted one, uniform color. Thus, viewers can create or deconstruct color by moving away from or closer to a Monocromo painting.” — Isabella Hutchinson and Susan Breyer

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